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Masterminds in Maintenance Podcast, Episode 3: How-To Develop Maintenance and Reliability Processes at Your Organization with Ricky Smith CMRP, CRL, CMRT

Matching an industry-leading software company with industry leaders.

Here at UpKeep, we pride ourselves on our mobile-first CMMS. Our mission is to empower maintenance teams to revolutionize their businesses. UpKeep was recently named a front-runner by Gartner as a software. However, we want to change the future of maintenance beyond our product.

That’s why we’re turning to industry leaders to share their insights on our brand new podcast, Masterminds in Maintenance. Every week, UpKeep’s CEO, Ryan Chan, meets with a guest who has had an idea for how to shake things up in the maintenance and reliability industry. Sometimes, the idea failed, sometimes it made their businesses more successful, and other times their idea revolutionized entire industries.

Episode 3: Revolutionizing the future of maintenance.

This week’s guest is Ricky Smith, CMRP. Ricky joins the Masterminds in Maintenance podcast to discuss his journey of creating asset reliability and process reliability with his maintenance teams.

Ricky Smith, Maintenance & Reliability Best Practices Advisor and Ryan Chan, Host of Masterminds in Maintenance and CEO, UpKeep

Ricky Smith has huge knowledge and years of experience in the maintenance and reliability industry and we were so thrilled to have him join us on our podcast. Ricky Smith started his maintenance journey in the US army, where he wanted to go to school to become a heavy equipment mechanic. He went on to work at a refinery and then Alumex as a technician and then as a maintenance engineer. He’s held a wide range of roles from maintenance supervisor, to maintenance manager, to maintenance company commander while in Iraq. Ricky Smith’s wide global experience has brought him a unique perspective that “Maintenance is maintenance, it doesn’t matter where you go.” Learn more about Ricky’s journey on our podcast.

Listen to this week’s episode online here or on Apple podcasts here!
You can also watch the episode on our YouTube channel here!

Hear more from Ricky Smith on Twitter, Linkedin, or his website.

Join the conversation!

Are you an industry leader in the fields of maintenance and reliability? We want to hear from you! If you would like to be featured as a guest on our podcast, please sign up here.

Stay tuned for more inspiring guests to come in future episodes!

Transcript

Ryan Chan: 
00:00:00,659 –> 00:00:05,100
Welcome everyone to masterminds and maintenance,
a podcast for those with new ideas and maintenance.

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00:00:05,100 –> 00:00:06,100
I’m your host.

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00:00:06,100 –> 00:00:07,100
I’m Ryan.

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00:00:07,100 –> 00:00:08,160
I’m the CEO and founder of upkeep.

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Each week I’ll be meeting with a guest who’s
had an idea for how to shake things up in

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00:00:13,089 –> 00:00:15,740
the maintenance and reliability industry.

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00:00:15,740 –> 00:00:19,949
Sometimes the idea failed, sometimes it made
their business more successful and other times

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00:00:19,949 –> 00:00:23,199
their idea revolutionized an entire industry.

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00:00:23,199 –> 00:00:28,010
Today I’m excited to welcome Ricky Smith maintenance
and reliability, best practices advisor to

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00:00:28,010 –> 00:00:29,010
the show.

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I love reading Ricky’s thoughtful responses
to maintenance and reliability questions on

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LinkedIn and really appreciate the active
role that you’ve taken on to acknowledge you

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know, all of the experts in this space.

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Welcome Ricky to our show.

Ricky Smith: 
00:00:42,770 –> 00:00:44,510
Thank you very much for having me.

Ryan:
00:00:44,510 –> 00:00:45,510
Of course.

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Of course.

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Really, really excited about having you on
our show.

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Again, what I talked about is, you know, trying
to build better practices within the industry

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and get thought leaders like yourself to really
preach the word of reliability and maintenance.

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So first I kind of wanted to check in.

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I know that you’re over there on the east
coast.

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How’s it going over there with the Hurricane
Dorian.

Ricky:
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The hurricane where I’m at just took away
all the moisture in the air, so it was just

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bright, sunny shot skies.

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But along the coast where my mother lives,
they got hit pretty hard, but not, not as

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bad as some past hurricanes.

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So everything’s okay.

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[inaudible]

Ryan:
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All right, well I’m glad to hear that everything’s,
you know all right for you, your family as

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well.

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Let’s go ahead.

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I would love to learn more, a little bit about
yourself and maybe you could kick things off

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by sharing a little bit about yourself.

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And how you got started in this industry,
Ricky.

Ricky
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Okay.

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Well I started in the industry when in the
US army and wanting to go to school to be

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a heavy equipment mechanic.

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So I went to school, learned how to rebuild
about everything US army had.

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And when I got out of the army I worked with
civilians for awhile and ultimately get transferred

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to a unit in Germany.

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Worked on tanks mainly.

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But what I found was maintenance was maintenance,
the final mental is there.

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Once I got out of the army, I went to work
for a small company called Exxon at a refinery.

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You know, my dad worked there, you know.

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It’s a small company.

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A small company.

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It was easy to get in the refinery because
if you don’t know somebody, you don’t go to

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work there, you know.

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So I got in it, I learned a lot.

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I learned a lot there.

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I mean he’s the closest person to me and seniority
would have been there 30 years.

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Very senior organization.

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It taught me how to follow procedures, how
to do things to specifications and so it kind

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of set the foundation.

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Now unfortunately I was the first person to
leave Exxon maintenance ever, you know, except

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unless I guess maybe if something happened
to you outside work, but, but I was the first

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person to leave.

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I went to work for a company called Alumex,
Mount Holly, and ultimately became Alcoa,

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Mount Holly, the world-class maintenance model.

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And that’s where I learned really strategies,
you know, around how to plan, schedule and

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the execute work, the specifications.

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And while I was there as a technician, I also
worked as a, I became a maintenance engineer

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and technician.

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So I worked for a maintenance engineer we
had and that really advanced me as far as

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root cause analysis and identifying failures
and how to mitigate them and all.

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But that set the foundation to my whole life
and throughout life has been, I’ve been

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a maintenance supervisor, maintenance manager.

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I was a company commander in Iraq for a maintenance
company, not because that’s my maintenance

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background as officer, it was not, but it
so happens I work for one star general and

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he said, hey, I just relieved the company
commander from maintenance company going Iraq.

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I understand, you know that maintenance stuff.

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I am like oh my gosh, let’s see you in 365
days.

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So maintenance is maintenance, doesn’t matter
where you go.

Ryan:
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I love it.

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That’s such an awesome story Ricky.

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So I’m also curious, you know, what’s changed
since you first got started in this industry?

Ricky:
00:04:06,800 –> 00:04:09,730
You know a lot.

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There has been a lot with change, except with
technology, you know at CMMS we had the first

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fully integrated CMMS in the world when I
went to work at Alcoa or Alumax Mount Holly.

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So people didn’t understand software and how
do you input data.

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If you didn’t put data in, you didn’t get
the right data out or corrupt data in and

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corrupt data out.

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And I guess that set the foundation for a
lot of things with me and making sure that

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the CMMS no matter how you know, simple it
is or high advanced and I will tell you in

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most companies, and I say I’d say 90% plus
they don’t fully utilize their maintenance

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software.

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Whether it is SAP, oracle, whatever it is.

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They don’t fully use the capability.

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Yeah, absolutely.

Ryan:
00:04:54,380 –> 00:05:01,300
Where do you see people not using a CMMS to
its fullest capabilities most commonly?

Ricky:
00:05:01,300 –> 00:05:03,660
Most simple one.

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They don’t put all work into work history.

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They don’t capture all events, all activities
on work orders, charts that are right asset.

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That’s the big problem.

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We want a blanket work order..

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With a blanket work order doesn’t tell me
anything.

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Where my failures are, which once are recurring
or tied to other equipment and so on.

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So it’s crazy.

Ryan:
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Absolutely.

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So this data quality piece is so, so important
for being able to drive decisions.

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You know, Ricky, I’ve read your book rules
of thumb and you commonly referred to mount

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Holly as kind of the world class standard
for maintenance, reliability.

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What was that journey like of getting, you
know, that facility to world class standards?

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Cause I imagine it was a, it was a long journey,
right?

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It didn’t just happen overnight.

Ricky:
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No, it was a long journey.

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It was a new facility.

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The engineer and the maintenance manager came
from Lycoming and which was the helicopter

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engine company.

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He was a QA engineer, sharp, acute quality
assurance at helicopters.

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So he took that philosophy and what he did
was brought smart people in to the design,

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planning, scheduling, work execution.

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All the things that need to get the desired
outcome.

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Like he’s saying things to have a helicopter,
it’s got to go up and down in a controlled

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state.

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He expect a $1 billion Aluminum smelter to
produce what it’s supposed to produce and

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that cost is supposed to produce to that.

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And that’s what we did.

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So he brought experts in.

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I was not one of them that had that depth
of knowledge at that time to understand it.

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But fully integrated maintenance software
we had.

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Condition of employment was all work had to
be in the CMMS, condition of employment.

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And some of the people didn’t make it.

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Some people got terminated because of that.

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So when you close out a work order, your data
had to be accurate.

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Had to be correct.

Ryan:
00:07:03,070 –> 00:07:04,070
Wow.

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So what I’m hearing is like the data quality
was kind of the fundamentals of being able

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to, you know, make improvements onto the business
and get you guys to this world-class standard.

Ricky:
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Absolutely.

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You know, and people try to duplicate this,
you know, I mean, some large corporations

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came in and paid a lot of money to just plan,
to learn their model and none of them went

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back and did much.

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They may have spiked a little bit, but then
they dropped off.

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Unfortunately.

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It’s terrible.

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You don’t let it happen, but it requires discipline.

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It requires a process and it requires metrics
to build a manager leading and lagging metrics.

Ryan:
00:07:40,759 –> 00:07:42,500
Yup, Absolutely.

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So, you know, we talk about reliability, world-class
standards, you know, I feel like, you know,

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after talking to many, many people in the
industry, everyone’s Kind of got their own

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little definition of what reliability is,
whether and it kind of depends on who you

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are, what industry you’re in.

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So, Ricky, what does reliability mean to you
and what does getting to world class standards

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mean?

Ricky:
00:08:07,130 –> 00:08:12,690
Oh, reliability is really about meeting the
functional requirements of the end user.

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If it’s an asset, the function requirements
of that asset, so the asset is supposed to

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perform at a certain level, rate, speed, you
know, function, whatever function that is,

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then reliability is be able to provide that.

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Just the reliability of the asset.

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It’s like buying a new car.

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We don’t want to buy a new car and it break
down, so we want it reliable.

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But the same thing goes true.

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There is two types of reliability.

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There’s asset reliability or the equipment
side and there’s this process reliability.

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And if we don’t have both stable and in a
focused effort to keep us there, then we’re

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not going to be fully successful.

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We may be successful, but not where we could
be.

Ryan: 
00:08:56,279 –> 00:08:58,019
Yeah, absolutely.

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And so I read a recent post of yours and we’re
talking about having reliability.

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Success.

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I imagine a lot of having success requires
a lot of planning.

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So your most recent posts regarding maintenance
planning, where do you see the biggest mistakes

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that people are making with regards to maintenance
planning?

Ricky: 
00:09:18,670 –> 00:09:23,839
Oh, you know, this is kind of a humorous conversation.

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I always kept bringing up is that, you know,
you are in reactive maintenance, if you maintenance

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planner is chasing parts every day for, for
current jobs because once the planner is for

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future work only, you know, future work only.

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If it’s Today’s activities is the maintenance
supervisor’s responsibility to handle, not

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the planner.

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If you want to be successful, make sure you’ve
got a planner, make sure that no one touches

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this person.

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I mean it’s, sometimes you have to talk to
them, you know, sometimes that happens, but

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it will be a rare occasion.

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You go see the maintenance planner, got to
be rare.

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Got It.

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So what I’m hearing is like having a separation
of concerns, a separation of people, roles

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and responsibilities.

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Someone who thinks about the future versus
someone who thinks about that today and what

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I hear is you’re breaking it out between a
maintenance supervisor handles the today activities

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and the maintenance planner handles the tomorrow
activities and the future activities.

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The future, right.

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So the planner is strategic.

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The supervisor is tactical.

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And so I can imagine a lot of people asking
this question next is when is it the right

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time to hire and separate these into two different
roles?

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How do you know when it’s the right time?

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That’s the way you start.

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You got to start somewhere.

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I mean if you reactive starting anywhere,
it’s going to get you somewhere with a planner.

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You know, a lot of people want to go outside
and hire a planner.

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I’m more taking the best maintenance technician
that will sit up behind a desk.

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I can use a computer.

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I want to make them a maintenance planner.

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I want to have them formally trained.

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But when they’re formally trained, send them
somewhere to accompany as trains maintenance

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planners.

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00:11:14,439 –> 00:11:17,709
But make sure you send the maintenance manager
with that plan.

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00:11:17,709 –> 00:11:23,379
So them two together can learn together because
otherwise people send planners off to training.

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00:11:23,379 –> 00:11:28,629
I’ve trained a lot of them and they go back
and there’s like, you know, we are talking

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about maintenance planning and they don’t
even understand the real definition of maintenance

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plan and scheduling.

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I said, yeah, I told you to bring the guy
with you.

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That’s the only way it’s going to work.

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You got to bring the boss with you.

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Or the other option is bring the instructor
back to the plant to train the plant, on planting

208
00:11:49,869 –> 00:11:50,869
schedule.

209
00:11:50,869 –> 00:11:51,869
Yeah, that’s huge.

210
00:11:51,869 –> 00:11:58,170
So, what I heard getting buy in from multiple
stakeholders is really important, especially

211
00:11:58,170 –> 00:12:02,750
when you’re thinking about separating this
role.

212
00:12:02,750 –> 00:12:09,040
So imagine, you know, we’ve got a brand new
facility that’s trying to take on reliability

213
00:12:09,040 –> 00:12:12,920
and you know, basically saying, hey, we’re
going to take in and maintenance technician,

214
00:12:12,920 –> 00:12:19,629
turn them into the scheduler, the planner,
any tips, tricks, advice that you give this

215
00:12:19,629 –> 00:12:25,949
new person coming into this new role to how
to create, to think about how to create an

216
00:12:25,949 –> 00:12:28,069
effective maintenance plan.

217
00:12:28,069 –> 00:12:31,920
Alright, I’m going to take a step even further
back.

218
00:12:31,920 –> 00:12:33,420
Let me think about it.

219
00:12:33,420 –> 00:12:34,420
Let’s go.

220
00:12:34,420 –> 00:12:39,570
You spent $1 billion on a plant, you know,
and you really don’t have insurance on the

221
00:12:39,570 –> 00:12:40,570
reliability.

222
00:12:40,570 –> 00:12:45,639
You may have monetary insurance, but really
what is your customers want?

223
00:12:45,639 –> 00:12:49,769
And that is they expect a certain quality
output, you know on demand.

224
00:12:49,769 –> 00:12:52,199
And that’s what we got to deliver.

225
00:12:52,199 –> 00:12:56,929
So in order to do that, we have to have a
maintenance strategy, reliability strategy

226
00:12:56,929 –> 00:13:01,059
that’s going to protect that process and asset
reliability.

227
00:13:01,059 –> 00:13:05,829
Because if we want to be the lowest cost producers,
and we’ve looked at maintenance costs as a

228
00:13:05,829 –> 00:13:12,279
percentage of replacement and asset value
is that reactive plants are extremely high.

229
00:13:12,279 –> 00:13:20,829
You know upwards of 18% and then where world-class
plants for somewhere between 1.7 and 3.4%,

230
00:13:20,829 –> 00:13:23,070
that’s not a massive amount.

231
00:13:23,070 –> 00:13:25,569
Imagine the production lost if we are spending
that much money on maintenance.

232
00:13:25,569 –> 00:13:26,569
Huge.

233
00:13:26,569 –> 00:13:27,569
It’s massive.

234
00:13:27,569 –> 00:13:29,999
It’s massive.

235
00:13:29,999 –> 00:13:34,069
So if you want to, if you’re going to build
a new plant, need an insurance policy, and

236
00:13:34,069 –> 00:13:38,879
that’s proactive maintenance, not just planning
and scheduling, just total proactive maintenance.

237
00:13:38,879 –> 00:13:39,879
Yeah.

Ryan:
00:13:39,879 –> 00:13:47,029
So this is a really good conversation into
this next question here around you know, KPIs,

239
00:13:47,029 –> 00:13:54,630
you know, we look at total replacement value
and maintenance as a function of that.

240
00:13:54,630 –> 00:14:00,279
What are the best KPIs to track as a maintenance,
reliability department, especially as we think

241
00:14:00,279 –> 00:14:05,119
about moving away from, you know, firefighting
into more of a proactive role?

Ricky:
00:14:05,119 –> 00:14:07,720
Well, great question.

243
00:14:07,720 –> 00:14:11,380
You know what I like is one is have a dashboard
where everybody can see it.

244
00:14:11,380 –> 00:14:15,829
You know, up on the big screen when you walk
in a plant, that will hit you right in the

245
00:14:15,829 –> 00:14:16,829
face.

246
00:14:16,829 –> 00:14:18,740
What’s our maintenance data, what’s it look
like?

247
00:14:18,740 –> 00:14:22,420
And then in the maintenance shop, break room,
wherever I can see it.

248
00:14:22,420 –> 00:14:24,109
I’m trying to change people’s behavior.

249
00:14:24,109 –> 00:14:29,549
So some of the metrics I’d have start with,
we’re talking about preventive maintenance

250
00:14:29,549 –> 00:14:32,089
is where a lot of the work’s going to come
from.

251
00:14:32,089 –> 00:14:36,499
So preventive maintenance, what’s my percentage,
my pm compliance.

252
00:14:36,499 –> 00:14:41,769
But also besides pm compliance, I like pm
Labor hours versus emergency labor hours.

253
00:14:41,769 –> 00:14:43,769
I like to trend it.

254
00:14:43,769 –> 00:14:48,239
Because it doesn’t make sense if we’re performing
preventive maintenance on equipment It continues

255
00:14:48,239 –> 00:14:51,959
to break down, that’s called insanity.

256
00:14:51,959 –> 00:14:54,820
And then planning, percentage of plan work.

257
00:14:54,820 –> 00:15:00,490
SMRP, society for maintenance, reliability
professionals made up of members like myself.

258
00:15:00,490 –> 00:15:03,129
That’s why you’ve said CMRP at the end of
my name.

259
00:15:03,129 –> 00:15:04,399
It isn’t about being certified.

260
00:15:04,399 –> 00:15:09,249
It is about being in a community where you
can learn from some of the best practices.

261
00:15:09,249 –> 00:15:17,129
So within that SMRP has created, our membership,
we’ve created metrics, definitions for those

262
00:15:17,129 –> 00:15:20,929
metrics for all up for the school board and
for a lot of things.

263
00:15:20,929 –> 00:15:22,699
So I’d give you an example.

264
00:15:22,699 –> 00:15:23,790
[15:24 inaudible].

265
00:15:23,790 –> 00:15:27,279
So we got a percentage of plan work.

266
00:15:27,279 –> 00:15:32,199
You know, we’ve got pm Labor hours versus
emergency labor hours, percentage of plan

267
00:15:32,199 –> 00:15:36,029
work and there’s a structure to that metric.

268
00:15:36,029 –> 00:15:37,029
Scheduled compliance.

269
00:15:37,029 –> 00:15:39,120
I like it by day by hour.

270
00:15:39,120 –> 00:15:40,120
Okay.

271
00:15:40,120 –> 00:15:42,769
Some people do it by week, but that means
you got reactivity.

272
00:15:42,769 –> 00:15:43,819
We can’t do it today.

273
00:15:43,819 –> 00:15:46,709
We’ll push it off tomorrow, we’ll still get
up our compliance.

274
00:15:46,709 –> 00:15:50,249
It doesn’t work that way in my world.

275
00:15:50,249 –> 00:15:51,249
Okay.

276
00:15:51,249 –> 00:15:55,999
And then when we do the, when we go forward
with that work execution.

277
00:15:55,999 –> 00:16:01,869
So when we execute the work, do we have rework
from that, reworks a metric that says we perform

278
00:16:01,869 –> 00:16:06,120
maintenance on it, but we had to go back to
it within a certain amount of time and had

279
00:16:06,120 –> 00:16:07,470
a problem with it again.

280
00:16:07,470 –> 00:16:09,160
And it’s probably one or two things.

281
00:16:09,160 –> 00:16:15,869
They see the same problem we didn’t solve
or we were trying to solve the wrong problem

282
00:16:15,869 –> 00:16:17,610
and then get down to it.

283
00:16:17,610 –> 00:16:21,629
I want to know, you know, my work orders,
what percentage of my work orders are closed

284
00:16:21,629 –> 00:16:24,259
out with all the codes identified.

285
00:16:24,259 –> 00:16:26,769
Because once those codes going into CMMS.

286
00:16:26,769 –> 00:16:27,769
You can’t change it.

287
00:16:27,769 –> 00:16:30,470
I mean you can go in, manipulate it, you think,
but you can’t.

288
00:16:30,470 –> 00:16:31,470
It’s in there.

289
00:16:31,470 –> 00:16:32,470
It’s solid.

290
00:16:32,470 –> 00:16:33,470
Yeah, absolutely.

Ryan: 
00:16:33,470 –> 00:16:39,709
So we talked about some KPIs that are related
to preventative maintenance, whether it’s

292
00:16:39,709 –> 00:16:43,259
pm compliance, whether that’s labor hours.

293
00:16:43,259 –> 00:16:48,309
Whether that’s, you know, what percentage
of your jobs are proactive in nature.

294
00:16:48,309 –> 00:16:55,480
I think the common thing that we’ve also seen
too is shifting away from doing PMs just to

295
00:16:55,480 –> 00:16:59,079
say we finish the task.

296
00:16:59,079 –> 00:17:03,720
So I think the question there is like how
do we make sure that we’re not just tracking

297
00:17:03,720 –> 00:17:07,230
work that’s being done just to make it be
done?

298
00:17:07,230 –> 00:17:08,940
How do we make sure that our PMs are effective?

299
00:17:08,940 –> 00:17:10,600
How about that?

Ricky:

300
00:17:10,600 –> 00:17:16,600
Yeah, well that’s why I like pm Labor hours
versus emergency urgent labor hours.

301
00:17:16,600 –> 00:17:18,190
Track it and trend it.

302
00:17:18,190 –> 00:17:19,190
It’s just logical.

303
00:17:19,190 –> 00:17:23,450
I did that as a maintenance supervisor and
it shot my maintenance technicians.

304
00:17:23,450 –> 00:17:27,740
They didn’t like it, they didn’t want to see
it and I said, it has nothing to do with you.

305
00:17:27,740 –> 00:17:29,380
It has to do, We have a process problem.

306
00:17:29,380 –> 00:17:30,710
It’s not a people problem.

307
00:17:30,710 –> 00:17:31,930
It’s a process.

308
00:17:31,930 –> 00:17:36,290
We’ve got to get this process functional and
we did and well, how long did it take?

309
00:17:36,290 –> 00:17:40,730
I don’t know until we really started making
some serious gains with probably six months

310
00:17:40,730 –> 00:17:45,400
to eight months, but we were focused on it
every day.

Ryan:

311
00:17:45,400 –> 00:17:46,400
That’s huge.

312
00:17:46,400 –> 00:17:50,160
And we often talk about creating a shift.

313
00:17:50,160 –> 00:17:57,100
Any like advice there on how to create a cultural
shift inside the entire company, within the

314
00:17:57,100 –> 00:17:59,660
department.

Ricky:
00:17:59,660 –> 00:18:00,660
All about the money.

316
00:18:00,660 –> 00:18:04,610
It is a big one, if you could.

317
00:18:04,610 –> 00:18:06,270
I mean there are ways of doing it.

318
00:18:06,270 –> 00:18:09,000
Calculate how much losses there are in a plant.

319
00:18:09,000 –> 00:18:14,560
You know, it has to be done formally, has
to be done in a state that management will

320
00:18:14,560 –> 00:18:15,970
accept it.

321
00:18:15,970 –> 00:18:21,060
And once you have those numbers and you look
at it and you quantify where the losses of

322
00:18:21,060 –> 00:18:22,530
being, you know, where they go to.

323
00:18:22,530 –> 00:18:27,040
Because in most companies I can tell you 99%
accompanies most of your losses come from

324
00:18:27,040 –> 00:18:28,040
production, not maintenance.

325
00:18:28,040 –> 00:18:32,630
They blame it on maintenance, but it’s really
production cost losses.

326
00:18:32,630 –> 00:18:36,140
So looking at that as a big deal, how much
are you losing money?

327
00:18:36,140 –> 00:18:38,500
There’s a numerous ways you can do it.

328
00:18:38,500 –> 00:18:43,500
Viable, we use viable for looking at, you
know, process losses, but not monetary losses.

329
00:18:43,500 –> 00:18:49,610
We can use process viable will do the same
thing in our process, how we work, how much

330
00:18:49,610 –> 00:18:52,880
money we lose.

331
00:18:52,880 –> 00:18:53,880
Got It.

332
00:18:53,880 –> 00:19:00,120
So it’s, it’s really centered around tracking
KPIs and associating all of these things that

333
00:19:00,120 –> 00:19:05,350
we’re doing to how it affects the value of
the business and the entire production line

334
00:19:05,350 –> 00:19:13,630
or whether that’s yeah, the dollars that we
lose from process problems.

335
00:19:13,630 –> 00:19:19,660
And you know, we got repeatable failures on
similar equipment and we don’t even know it

336
00:19:19,660 –> 00:19:21,970
because we don’t track the inflammation.

337
00:19:21,970 –> 00:19:26,540
If you have a motor problem in once part of
the plant and you’ve probably got motor problems

338
00:19:26,540 –> 00:19:29,800
everywhere in the plant, you just don’t know
it, because it’s not linked together, you’re

339
00:19:29,800 –> 00:19:31,660
seeing the mess.

340
00:19:31,660 –> 00:19:33,010
Yep.

Ryan:
00:19:33,010 –> 00:19:38,730
So let’s talk a little bit about common failures
for assets and their failure patterns.

342
00:19:38,730 –> 00:19:44,420
I read one of this statistics that you more
recently published as well that, you know,

343
00:19:44,420 –> 00:19:50,200
89% of failures are random and only 11% of
failures are age related.

344
00:19:50,200 –> 00:19:56,240
Knowing that 89% of failures are random, what
can we do as, you know, budding reliability

345
00:19:56,240 –> 00:19:58,870
leaders to get ahead of this problem?

Ricky:
00:19:58,870 –> 00:20:04,290
Well, first thing is making sure that equipment
is kept in a maintainable condition.

347
00:20:04,290 –> 00:20:08,940
If it’s not in a maintainable condition, then
it doesn’t do any good.

348
00:20:08,940 –> 00:20:13,550
You know what I call an insanity performing
preventive maintenance on equipment that continues

349
00:20:13,550 –> 00:20:14,550
to fail.

350
00:20:14,550 –> 00:20:18,470
So best thing to do is you have an equipment
and it continues to fail, perform preventive

351
00:20:18,470 –> 00:20:21,590
maintenance on it, put a big sticker on it,
RTF, run to failure.

352
00:20:21,590 –> 00:20:24,700
And we know that’s our main strategy.

353
00:20:24,700 –> 00:20:25,700
Okay.

354
00:20:25,700 –> 00:20:29,470
So, also how equipment is operating, you know,
it has a lot to do with those human induced

355
00:20:29,470 –> 00:20:30,470
failures.

356
00:20:30,470 –> 00:20:35,540
And the 89% of failures, you know, the random
ones, random ones, the best way to mitigate

357
00:20:35,540 –> 00:20:40,910
random, you know, the mitigate them is pm
to actually identify them.

358
00:20:40,910 –> 00:20:43,460
Cause some you can’t identify far enough in
advance.

359
00:20:43,460 –> 00:20:46,960
Some you can, use a predictive maintenance
or condition monitoring.

360
00:20:46,960 –> 00:20:48,520
That’s what we do.

361
00:20:48,520 –> 00:20:54,930
A lot of people, I’d say 90% of companies
I’m giving a generic number, but I’ll tell

362
00:20:54,930 –> 00:20:56,530
you it’s very true.

363
00:20:56,530 –> 00:21:00,670
90% of companies use PDM only for insurance
reasons.

364
00:21:00,670 –> 00:21:04,960
So once a year or every six months, someone
comes in and does some vibration and does

365
00:21:04,960 –> 00:21:06,860
some infrared and they’re gone.

366
00:21:06,860 –> 00:21:09,270
That’s not the way it works.

367
00:21:09,270 –> 00:21:15,010
Asset needs, your assets need to be identified
based on criticality and defect severity.

368
00:21:15,010 –> 00:21:19,480
Once you do that, then you go through that
ranking and then determine which assets do

369
00:21:19,480 –> 00:21:21,880
I want to put PDM on and what interval.

370
00:21:21,880 –> 00:21:26,730
It always goes down to the lowest common denominator,
like an electric motor.

371
00:21:26,730 –> 00:21:32,430
What fails first in electric motor, bearings. So if bearings fail first and we get an

372
00:21:32,430 –> 00:21:34,540
indication and bearings fail randomly.

373
00:21:34,540 –> 00:21:40,890
SKF has proven that all the studies, you know,
so when someone does vibration analysis and

374
00:21:40,890 –> 00:21:45,530
says, Hey, we’ve got a bearing fault on this
outboard bearings on this 50 horsepower motor,

375
00:21:45,530 –> 00:21:49,900
you know, first thing they ask is how long
you think it’ll run?

376
00:21:49,900 –> 00:21:51,820
I mean, I’ve got no magic wand.

377
00:21:51,820 –> 00:21:55,370
It sold out, It was a long time ago.

378
00:21:55,370 –> 00:21:58,120
I’d say what you needed to do is go ahead
and plan it.

379
00:21:58,120 –> 00:22:01,070
You may not schedule it now if you can’t interrupt
production.

380
00:22:01,070 –> 00:22:03,110
Plan it, have a new motor waiting.

381
00:22:03,110 –> 00:22:08,700
You’re ready to go or rebuild shop ready to
go whenever that is, the weekend or whatever.

382
00:22:08,700 –> 00:22:14,340
And we go in and replace it and yes, it is
still running, but it will fail randomly.

383
00:22:14,340 –> 00:22:15,340
I promise you.

384
00:22:15,340 –> 00:22:17,050
And it’s not at the right time either

385
00:22:17,050 –> 00:22:18,570
It’s never at the right time.

386
00:22:18,570 –> 00:22:19,570
Huh?

387
00:22:19,570 –> 00:22:21,890
Never the right time.

Ryan:
00:22:21,890 –> 00:22:26,450
So I also read your 95% of equipment from
that study.

389
00:22:26,450 –> 00:22:32,220
You mentioned 95% would benefit from some
sort of condition monitoring and that only

390
00:22:32,220 –> 00:22:37,360
6% benefit from some sort of time-based replacement
or overhaul.

391
00:22:37,360 –> 00:22:42,360
Do you think companies are relying too much
on time-based replacement, time-based preventative

392
00:22:42,360 –> 00:22:43,520
maintenance?

Ricky:
00:22:43,520 –> 00:22:48,410
Well, when you get into like all refined and
resolve, I mean sometimes you know a lot of

394
00:22:48,410 –> 00:22:52,770
the data come from them and when they have
an outage you have to, you have to look at

395
00:22:52,770 –> 00:22:57,630
everything that could possibly fail and change
the valve, especially based on criticality.

396
00:22:57,630 –> 00:23:03,160
So if the criticality of that asset is extremely
high and risk of business is high, then we’re

397
00:23:03,160 –> 00:23:06,120
probably going rebuild it, replace it.

398
00:23:06,120 –> 00:23:10,810
But in normal companies, no you don’t have
that.

399
00:23:10,810 –> 00:23:14,000
So it’s a different, depends on what market
you’re looking at.

400
00:23:14,000 –> 00:23:20,800
And so some of the data come from oil and
gas or mining and everybody’s a little bit

401
00:23:20,800 –> 00:23:21,800
different.

402
00:23:21,800 –> 00:23:23,630
Sure, absolutely.

Ryan:
00:23:23,630 –> 00:23:27,220
So kind of pivoting a little bit, what do
you see some of the biggest mistakes that

404
00:23:27,220 –> 00:23:33,070
people often make in the maintenance reliability
space, especially for new up and coming reliability

405
00:23:33,070 –> 00:23:34,130
leaders?

Ricky:
00:23:34,130 –> 00:23:37,580
Well, one, they don’t have procedures.

407
00:23:37,580 –> 00:23:40,340
People don’t have repeatable procedures.

408
00:23:40,340 –> 00:23:41,540
That’s a big one.

409
00:23:41,540 –> 00:23:45,370
For up and coming, I mean that’s a big one.

410
00:23:45,370 –> 00:23:47,100
I would definitely start writing procedures.

411
00:23:47,100 –> 00:23:53,120
In fact, I’d say in the last three years,
100% of the plants I’ve been in don’t have

412
00:23:53,120 –> 00:23:54,200
repeatable procedures.

413
00:23:54,200 –> 00:23:55,450
They thought they did.

414
00:23:55,450 –> 00:23:58,310
But when really detailed out it’s not.

415
00:23:58,310 –> 00:24:01,980
So the worst thing that could happen if you
have a failure, you pull out the procedure

416
00:24:01,980 –> 00:24:06,550
and say what went wrong and you don’t do it
by chastising it.

Ryan:

00:24:06,550 –> 00:24:10,780
When you had a technician that worked on it,
did you see any difference in procedure?

Ricky:
00:24:10,780 –> 00:24:13,740
Oh yeah, man, I missed the step.

419
00:24:13,740 –> 00:24:15,860
Okay this was on me.

420
00:24:15,860 –> 00:24:16,890
Next one is on you.

421
00:24:16,890 –> 00:24:17,890
Yeah.

422
00:24:17,890 –> 00:24:21,850
I mean, you’ve got to change that culture,
but you can’t use a hammer to do it.

423
00:24:21,850 –> 00:24:23,430
You got to do it slowly.

424
00:24:23,430 –> 00:24:25,250
Yeah, Absolutely.

425
00:24:25,250 –> 00:24:35,440
So and again, like going towards the new reliability,
reliability leaders, what resources do you

426
00:24:35,440 –> 00:24:39,880
find yourself, you know, leaning towards to
learn more about the industry and hone your

427
00:24:39,880 –> 00:24:41,130
skills and your knowledge?

428
00:24:41,130 –> 00:24:47,330
Where do you go for new ideas and thoughts
in this industry?

Ricky:
00:24:47,330 –> 00:24:48,760
I mean that’s a great question.

430
00:24:48,760 –> 00:24:52,480
I mean, the best I’d tell you 100% SMRP conference.

431
00:24:52,480 –> 00:24:56,190
You know, what else is supposing of conference?

432
00:24:56,190 –> 00:24:59,250
I tell you it’s no smoke and mirrors.

433
00:24:59,250 –> 00:25:03,910
You know the people to speak in there firsthand,
this is what I did.

434
00:25:03,910 –> 00:25:08,250
Be prepared if you come have a list of issues
you have in your plant and look for those

435
00:25:08,250 –> 00:25:12,470
ahead of topic so you’ve got it mapped out,
which session you want to go to and then what

436
00:25:12,470 –> 00:25:14,800
the expectations are when you come back.

437
00:25:14,800 –> 00:25:19,410
And you may even if as a consultant there
and say, you know, I like what he said, you

438
00:25:19,410 –> 00:25:21,760
may want to say, can I bring you back with
me?

439
00:25:21,760 –> 00:25:23,390
When can you come see me?

440
00:25:23,390 –> 00:25:25,480
Because there’s nothing wrong with that.

441
00:25:25,480 –> 00:25:27,210
You know it works well.

442
00:25:27,210 –> 00:25:31,950
Other conferences, I like international maintenance
conference, you know, and I’ll tell you

443
00:25:31,950 –> 00:25:33,540
that’s an awesome conference.

444
00:25:33,540 –> 00:25:38,080
What I like to do there is go there and breakfast
in the morning, you know, and you meet one

445
00:25:38,080 –> 00:25:40,020
person there looks really like glum.

446
00:25:40,020 –> 00:25:42,830
Like oh my God, not they drank too much.

447
00:25:42,830 –> 00:25:46,580
It’s just they’re bummed out about what they
are hearing.

448
00:25:46,580 –> 00:25:48,030
So how’s things going?

449
00:25:48,030 –> 00:25:49,090
Going good.

450
00:25:49,090 –> 00:25:50,090
Yeah.

451
00:25:50,090 –> 00:25:53,340
I say, how do you say the conference going?

452
00:25:53,340 –> 00:25:55,900
I’ve learned a lot, a lot.

453
00:25:55,900 –> 00:25:59,490
[25:59 inaudible] I said, okay, this is the
way I look at it.

454
00:25:59,490 –> 00:26:05,340
Just take one or two things that you’ve learned
and take it back with you.

455
00:26:05,340 –> 00:26:06,770
One of two things.

456
00:26:06,770 –> 00:26:11,270
[26:09 inaudible] the guy that was speaking
in that session, buy him a beer at night or

457
00:26:11,270 –> 00:26:15,750
you know, buy him dinner or something and
get their ideas and that way you can take

458
00:26:15,750 –> 00:26:16,810
it back with you.

459
00:26:16,810 –> 00:26:20,600
Never go to a conference without bringing
some action items back.

460
00:26:20,600 –> 00:26:22,260
Don’t ever do that.

461
00:26:22,260 –> 00:26:25,410
It’s a waste of your time, waste of the company’s
money.

Ryan:
00:26:25,410 –> 00:26:26,410
That’s huge.

463
00:26:26,410 –> 00:26:29,680
I genuinely believe that too Ricky.

464
00:26:29,680 –> 00:26:32,380
And I believe the SMRP is next month in October.

465
00:26:32,380 –> 00:26:33,550
Is that right?

466
00:26:33,550 –> 00:26:35,090
Yes, it is.

467
00:26:35,090 –> 00:26:36,090
Very cool.

Ryan:
00:26:36,090 –> 00:26:38,880
So, you know, are you going to be at the SMRP
Ricky?

469
00:26:38,880 –> 00:26:44,630
Where can our listeners go to, to contact
you and find you?

Ricky:
00:26:44,630 –> 00:26:50,620
Best way to contact me is on LinkedIn or LinkedIn
is the easiest way.

471
00:26:50,620 –> 00:26:55,390
Ricky Smith, CMRP So it’s a certified maintenance
reliability professional.

472
00:26:55,390 –> 00:26:59,160
That’s what I use Ricky Smith, CMRP or you
can go on Twitter.

473
00:26:59,160 –> 00:27:01,440
Follow me on Twitter, Facebook.

474
00:27:01,440 –> 00:27:08,350
I have a I have a Facebook page, www.worldclassmaintenance.org,
you know, on Facebook page so they can look

475
00:27:08,350 –> 00:27:09,730
that up too.

476
00:27:09,730 –> 00:27:11,980
So plenty of places to find me.

477
00:27:11,980 –> 00:27:17,530
And I share a lot of information with a lot
of people, so I’m not, I not [27:17 inaudible]

478
00:27:17,530 –> 00:27:19,020
giving inflammation out.

479
00:27:19,020 –> 00:27:20,140
All right.

480
00:27:20,140 –> 00:27:22,830
All I ask, you do something with it.

481
00:27:22,830 –> 00:27:23,830
Amazing.

482
00:27:23,830 –> 00:27:26,900
I give you something, do something with it.

483
00:27:26,900 –> 00:27:27,900
Exactly.

484
00:27:27,900 –> 00:27:28,900
Awesome.

Ryan:
00:27:28,900 –> 00:27:29,900
Thanks so much, Ricky.

486
00:27:29,900 –> 00:27:30,900
I really appreciate it.

487
00:27:30,900 –> 00:27:33,490
Thanks so much for joining us on this show
and thank you to all of our listeners for

488
00:27:33,490 –> 00:27:37,210
tuning in to today’s maintenance or masterminds
and maintenance.